logo

Research

Help: To find Illnesses or Conditions associated with a Herbal Remedy. Select a letter from A - Z of Herbal Remedies. Or Scroll lists. Or Use Search.

Almonds


Almonds - Research
Some research on almonds suggests that daily intake may help lower cholesterol.5,6  
 
Historically, the whole almond nut was used as a folk remedy to relieve heartburn.4  More recently, almond oil has been used externally for its cleansing and protective properties for the skin.3  
 
The varied content of fat, carbohydrate, and protein along with many other nutrients, makes almonds a common food of choice when weight gain is desired. When taken orally, almond oil is easily digested and absorbed. It is absorbed through the skin more slowly. The cosmetic industry has found that both almond oil and almond meal tend to not irritate the skin, making them appropriate for cosmetic and skin care products. Products containing almond include lotions, creams, makeup, skin cleansers, and suntan lotions.2  
 
References:
2  Leung AY, Foster S, eds. Encyclopedia of Common Natural Ingredients Used in Food, Drugs, and Cosmetics. 2nd ed. New York: John Wiley and Sons, Inc; 1996.
 
3  Onstad D. Whole Foods Companion. White River Junction, VT: Chelsea Green Publishing Company; 1996.
 
4  Grieve M. A Modern Herbal. Vol 1. New York: Dover Books; 1971.
 
5  Abbey M. Partial replacement of saturated fatty acids with almonds or walnuts lowers total plasma cholesterol and low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol. Am J Clin Nut. 1994;59:995-999.
 
6  Spiller GA. Nuts and plasma lipids: an almond-based diet lowered LDL-C while preserving HDL-C. J Am College of Nut.1998;17:285-290.
 


Health Issues

Maca (Lepidum meyenii, Brassicaceae), a root vegetable grown in the Andean region of Peru, is widely used for its nutritional and therapeutic properties. Maca is said to improve male and female reproductive activity in diverse ways, from increasing arousal and reducing symptoms of menopause to boosting sperm quality,

VIEW MORE

The Food & Pandemics Report, produced by plant-based advocacy group ProVeg International, identifies the eating and farming of animals as “the single most risky human behaviour in relation to pandemics”, and calls for urgent changes to the global food system in order to prevent future outbreaks. The report has drawn support from inside the UN Environment Programme (UNEP).

VIEW MORE

An international team of researchers from Brazil, the United States and Sweden has found that polyphenols found in berries of the açaí palm (Euterpe oleracea)

VIEW MORE