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White Willow Bark


White Willow Bark
Other Names: White Willow Bark, White Willow, European Willow, Weeping Willow, Black Willow, Pussywillow, American Willow, Banjula, Bed Sada, Bai Liu, Salix Alba
Traditional Usages: Arthritis, Kidney Disease, Frozen Shoulder, Bunions, Eases Inflammation in the Joints and Tendons, Febrile Diseases of Rheumatic or Gouty Origin, Dyspepsia, Against Parasitic Worms, Reduce Fevers, Dandruff, Diarrhea, Dysentery, Headaches, Neuralgia, Stop Vomiting, Stops the heat of Lust in men and women, Cleans the skin from spots and discolourings. As a gargle for sore throats.
Resources: Asia, Britain, Europe, Africa, North America
Parts Used: Bark, Leaves.
Administration Method: Liquid and solid preparations
Herb Action: Anti-rheumatic, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antiseptic, astringent, antipyretic, antifungal, bitter digestive tonic
Health Warning: White willow should be used cautiously, especially during pregnancy and breast-feeding.
White willow bark contains salicin or salicylic acid, the basis for aspirin. It should not be used in conjunction with any blood-thinning medications.


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