logo

Research

Help: To find Illnesses or Conditions associated with a Herbal Remedy. Select a letter from A - Z of Herbal Remedies. Or Scroll lists. Or Use Search.

Butea Superba


More widely known as butea superba, the plant is of the vine family and grows primarily in Asia in countries such as Vietnam, India, China and Thailand. The plant is known by a variety of names throughout the world such as butea gum tree, kwao krua dang, red kwao krua and red kwao krua daeng. Also known as ‘flame of the forest’, the tree itself is a medium sized one that features compound leaves that fall during the winter and bloom between February and March. The parts used for medicinal properties include the gum extract, the seeds and the leaves. 

 
The gum of the butea tree is rich in gallic and tannic acids. Gallic acid is considered to be one of the more effective forms of antioxidants that keep the body free of any free radicals that are known to play a significant role in the development of a number of medical conditions. Despite the fact that butea superba is rich in gallic acid – which is very beneficial for a number of serious medical ailments, perhaps its most well-known use is the fact that it is very effective in boosting an individual’s sexual performance as well as helping cure certain issues like erectile dysfunction and premature ejaculation. This is primarily because of the fact that there is some evidence to suggest that the chemicals that are present in butea superba are known to act similarly to the hormones that help in the regulation of sexual performance and function.


Health Issues

Maca (Lepidum meyenii, Brassicaceae), a root vegetable grown in the Andean region of Peru, is widely used for its nutritional and therapeutic properties. Maca is said to improve male and female reproductive activity in diverse ways, from increasing arousal and reducing symptoms of menopause to boosting sperm quality,

VIEW MORE

The Food & Pandemics Report, produced by plant-based advocacy group ProVeg International, identifies the eating and farming of animals as “the single most risky human behaviour in relation to pandemics”, and calls for urgent changes to the global food system in order to prevent future outbreaks. The report has drawn support from inside the UN Environment Programme (UNEP).

VIEW MORE

An international team of researchers from Brazil, the United States and Sweden has found that polyphenols found in berries of the açaí palm (Euterpe oleracea)

VIEW MORE