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A – Z of Herbal Remedies

Help: To find Illnesses or Conditions associated with a Herbal Remedy. Select a letter from A - Z of Herbal Remedies. Or Scroll lists. Or Use Search.

Valerian Root Remedies

Other Names: Valerian, Garden Valerian, Common Valerian, All heal, Garden Helitrope, St George's Herb, Bloody Butcher, Capon's Tail, Cat's Valerian, Vandal Root, English Valerian, Fragrant Valerian, Amantilla, Valeriana Officinalis
Traditional Usages: Provokes Menstruation, Chest Pains, Eases Coughs and Phlegm, Bites and Stings, Flatulence, Inward and outward Wounds, Sedative for Insomnia and Nervous Anxiety, All Nervous Debilities, Hysteria and Epilepsy, Cholera, Strengthening Eyesight, Stress, Palpitations, Convulsions in Children, High Blood Pressure, Hypochondria, Irritability, Mental Confusion, Tension Headaches, Muscle and Intestinal Cramps, Bronchial Spasm, Menopausal Restlessness, Asthma, Colic and Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Phobias, Restless Legs
Resources: Europe, Asia, South Africa, Indonesia, the Himalayas, US, China
Parts Used: Root, Rhizome
Administration Method: Internal as pressed juice from fresh plants, tincture, extracts, and other galenical preparations. External as a bath additive.  
Herb Action: Anti-spasmodic, carminative, diuretic, expectorant, lowers blood pressure, sedative, sleep-promoting.
Herbal Research: Valerian
Health Warning: Avoid during Pregnancy and Breastfeeding. Do not take for more than 2 - 3 weeks without a break.
Side effects have been reported which  consist of headaches, excitability, restlessness, sleeplessness, dilated pupils, or irregular heartbeats. Because of Valerian’s ability to make you drowsy, you should not take it when operating machinery, driving a car, or performing any other activity that requires you to be fully awake and alert. Talk to your doctor if you plan to take valerian during withdrawal from drugs. This herb may worsen high blood pressure.


Valerian Root - Herbal remedy for Alzheimer’s Disease: Valerian root improves sleep patterns when taken at bedtime. Valerian root is derived from a plant native to Europe and Asia. The root of this plant has been used for thousands of years as a remedy for various ailments including sleep problems, digestive problems, disorders of the nervous system, headaches, and arthritis.  While valerian is most commonly administered orally, it may also be added to bath water to help relieve nervousness and to induce sleep. Similarly valerian can be boiled and the resulting steam can be inhaled to produce the same effect.
Valerian root is available from herbal stores. For herbal tea, first boil water and let it cool down to a lukewarm temperature. Then add chopped valerian roots, approximately one level teaspoon (or 2-3 g dried roots) for one cup. Adjust the valerian root quantities according to amount of water that you are using. Cover with lid and leave the infusion, preferably overnight. Next day you can drink your valerian tea after warming a bit, if preferred. Regarding consumption, 2-3 cups of valerian tea per day is normal. For people having trouble in sleeping, drinking one cup of valerian root tea about 40-minutes before bedtime will help in getting a sound sleep.

Valerian Root – Herbal remedy for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: Valerian root is often used for anxiety. Studies show that it promotes natural sleep after several weeks of use. It can be taken as a herbal tea. Infuse one tablespoon of dried herbs in one cup of boiling water, strain and drink. 

Always seek the advice of your doctor before taking herbal remedies
   

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