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A – Z of Herbal Remedies

Help: To find Illnesses or Conditions associated with a Herbal Remedy. Select a letter from A - Z of Herbal Remedies. Or Scroll lists. Or Use Search.

Oregon Grape Root

Other Names: Oregon Grape, Wild Oregon Grape, Rocky Mountain Grape, Trailing Mahonia, Sourberry, Barberry, Berberry, Holley-Leaved Berberry, Ash Barberry,  Berberis, Oregon berberina, Oregon Grape Root, Creeping Mahonia, Berberis Aquifolium
Traditional Usages: Food, Dyes, Liver Malfunctions, Loss of Appetite, General Debility, Detoxifier, Tonic, Fevers, Rectal Hemorrhage, Dysentery, Lung and Spleen Infections, Gallbladder Disease, Jaundice, Indigestion, Diarrhea, Tuberculosis, Piles, Urinary Tract Disorders, Gout, Rheumatism, Arthritis, Lumbago, Malaria, Hepatitis, Amebic Dysentery, Cholera, Gastrointestinal Infections, Psoriasis, Eczema, Bolis, Acne, Herpes, Syphilis
Resources: US, Canada, Egypt, China
Parts Used: Root, Stem Bark, Root Bark, Berries
Health Warning: Avoid during Pregnancy and Breastfeeding. Take for no more than 4 - 6 weeks without a break for 10 days.


Oregon Grape Root - Herbal remedy for Athletes Foot: Oregon grape root also has antibiotic and anticancer properties. Oregon grape root is taken either as a tea or tincture. To make tea simmer 1-2 teaspoons of dried, coarsely chopped root in a cup of water for 10-15 minutes. Strain and drink before each meal. A tincture is an alcohol extract of the root. Mix half to one teaspoon in 2-4 ounces of water. Drink this before each meal. Alcohol tinctures (also known as extracts) are the most popular because alcohol is the most effective at drawing out the important properties of the herbs .The amount of alcohol in tinctures is very low and makes it safe to drink. Alcohol is used as a base or as a preservative.

Oregon Grape Root – Herbal remedy for Bladder Infections: Oregon Grape Root has been used for years to treat bladder infections. It contains berberine which kills bacteria and prevents it from adhering to the bladder lining. One teaspoon of fresh or dried herb should be infused in one pint of hot water, strained and taken twice daily for two weeks. In capsule form take one capsule of 500 milligrams twice daily. In liquid form take one quarter or half teaspoon daily.

Oregon Grape Root - Herbal remedy for Zits: Oregon grape root is a herbal remedy that may be effective in treating your cystic acne. This herb has a bitter, astringent taste, drying and cooling properties. The root bark and stem bark of the shrub are used medicinally to help treat numerous health problems, including cystic acne.  Oregon grape root is an astringent, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant that is used to help treat skin conditions such as acne, psoriasis and dry eczema. 
One teaspoon of fresh or dried herb should be infused in one pint of hot water, strained  and taken twice daily for two weeks. In capsule form take one capsule of 500 milligrams twice daily. In liquid form take one quarter or half a teaspoon daily.
 
Health Warning - Oregon Grape Root: Before taking Oregon grape root to help treat your cystic acne, talk with your medical doctor about possible side effects, proper dosage and potential drug interactions.

Always seek the advice of your doctor before taking herbal remedies
   

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