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A – Z of Herbal Remedies

Help: To find Illnesses or Conditions associated with a Herbal Remedy. Select a letter from A - Z of Herbal Remedies. Or Scroll lists. Or Use Search.

White Willow Bark

White Willow Bark
Other Names: White Willow Bark, White Willow, European Willow, Weeping Willow, Black Willow, Pussywillow, American Willow, Banjula, Bed Sada, Bai Liu, Salix Alba
Traditional Usages: Arthritis, Kidney Disease, Frozen Shoulder, Bunions, Eases Inflammation in the Joints and Tendons, Febrile Diseases of Rheumatic or Gouty Origin, Dyspepsia, Against Parasitic Worms, Reduce Fevers, Dandruff, Diarrhea, Dysentery, Headaches, Neuralgia, Stop Vomiting, Stops the heat of Lust in men and women, Cleans the skin from spots and discolourings. As a gargle for sore throats.
Resources: Asia, Britain, Europe, Africa, North America
Parts Used: Bark, Leaves.
Administration Method: Liquid and solid preparations
Herb Action: Anti-rheumatic, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antiseptic, astringent, antipyretic, antifungal, bitter digestive tonic
Health Warning: White willow should be used cautiously, especially during pregnancy and breastfeeding. White willow bark contains salicin or salicylic acid, the basis for aspirin. It should not be used in conjunction with any blood-thinning medications.




White Willow Bark - Herbal  remedy for Back Pain: Investigation of salicin, a pain-relieving constituent in willow bark led to the discovery of aspirin in 1899. Willow bark extract providing 120-240 milligrams salicin has been used. The higher 240 milligram dose might be more  effective.
Health Warning: Patients with known hypersensitivity to aspirin should avoid any willow-containing product. This caution also applies to patients with asthma, impaired thrombocyte function, vitamin K antagonistic treatment, diabetes, gout, kidney or liver conditions, peptic ulcer disease, and in any other medical conditions in which aspirin is contraindicated. 

White Willow Bark Herbal  remedy for Fibromyalgia:  White willow bark has anti-inflammatory properties and works as a painkiller. Take one capsule of 225 milligrams of White Willow Bark four times daily.

White Willow Bark - Herbal  remedy for Headaches: White willow bark relieves pain. Take one tablet of 120 milligrams once a day.

 
White Willow Bark - Herbal  remedy for Measles: White willow bark can lower fever. It contains salicin, which is very similar to aspirin. Take one tablet of 120 milligrams once a day.

White Willow Bark - Herbal  remedy for Pain: The bark of the white willow has been used since ancient times to treat fever, pain and inflammation; it is especially useful in treating arthritis. The active ingredient is salicin, which is converted in the body into salicylic acid. This compound was first synthesized by chemists in the mid-nineteenth century. Later acetylsalicylic acid was developed, which is commonly known as aspirin.  Many people choose to take this “herbal aspirin” over synthetic aspirin because it is free of many side effects such as long term risks like blood thinning, or gastrointestinal problems. White willow bark is a remedy for both chronic and acute pain in the lower back, joints, or teeth, and can reduce inflammation and fever. Take one tablet of 120 milligrams once a day.
 

Always seek the advice of your doctor before taking herbal remedies
   

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