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A – Z of Herbal Remedies

Help: To find Illnesses or Conditions associated with a Herbal Remedy. Select a letter from A - Z of Herbal Remedies. Or Scroll lists. Or Use Search.

Wild Indigo Remedy

Other Names: Wild Indigo, Horse-fly Weed, Rattlebush, Indigo Broom, Yellow Wild Indigo, Plains Wild Indigo, False Indigo, Bastard Indigo, Baptisia Tinctoria, Baptisia Bracteata
Traditional Usages: Dyeing, Snake Bites, Bathing Cuts and Wounds, Tea for Fevers, Typhoid, and Pharyngitis, Gonorrhea and Kidney Disease, Chest Infections, Wash for Skin Infections, Infected Nipples, Gargle and Mouthwash for mouth, gums and throat infections, Influenza, Malaria and Typhus, Constipation, Acne
Resources: US
Parts Used: Roots, Leaves, Pod, Seed, Bark
Health Warning: Avoid during Pregnancy and Breastfeeding. Must only be taken under medical or professional supervision. Large doses may be toxic and may even cause death.


Wild Indigo - Herbal  remedy for Melanoma: Wild indigo has been used for centuries as a natural antibiotic against infections. Take half a teaspoon of an infusion prepared by boiling one tablespoon of wild indigo root in a cupful of hot water for 10-15 minutes. This may be drunk three times per day. It is advisable to take 12 drops of the tincture in half a glass of water three times daily.

Always seek the advice of your doctor before taking herbal remedies
   

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