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A – Z of Illnesses & Conditions

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Bacterial Vaginitis


Bacterial Vaginitis:  An inflammation of the vagina is known as vaginitis and it can result in a painful burning sensation along with a white or yellow discharge. A strong, unpleasant smell, particularly after sexual intercourse, can also be a sign.  It is caused by an irritation or infection of the vulva.

It is not certain what causes the bacteria in the vagina to get out of balance. But certain things make it more likely to happen. Your risk of getting bacteria is higher if you have more than one sex partner or have a new sex partner and if you smoke.

Vaginitis may be caused by any of the following infections or irritants:
  •     thrush, a fungal infection that commonly affects the vagina
  •     bacterial vaginosis, a bacterial infection of the vagina
  •     trichomoniasis, a sexually transmitted infection (STI) caused by a tiny parasite
  •     chemical irritation, for example from perfumed bubble bath, soap or fabric conditioner, or from spermicide  (a chemical that kills sperm, sometimes found on condoms)
  •     washing inside your vagina
  •     chlamydia, an STI caused by bacteria
  •     genital herpes, an STI caused by the herpes simplex virus

See your doctor if you suspect the cause of your sore vagina is an infection.


Always seek the advice of your doctor before taking herbal remedies
    


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